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  • My next 9 months. The ‘Real’ Nam is coming back !!! There was a time I thought my dream was over.... still here i am the flame as strong as ever!! ...
  • My next 9 months. The ‘Real’ Nam is coming back !!! There was a time I thought my dream was over.... still here i am the flame as strong as ever!! #phdlife #scientist
  • 0 0 12 minutes ago
  • 1 1 12 minutes ago
  • It’s FINALLY Friday, my dudes!!!!! Which means I finally have time to make a lil post about my dissertation work AKA what I spend 99% of my time on...
  • It’s FINALLY Friday, my dudes!!!!! Which means I finally have time to make a lil post about my dissertation work AKA what I spend 99% of my time on. Let’s talk about ink!!! 🐌🦑🐋 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ...⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ While brainstorming project ideas my PI was like “hey we have a bunch of Pygmy sperm whale ink in the freezer and we know nothing about it so you should figure that out.” So bam, my dissertation was born 👶🏽 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ...⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ So since we know almost nothing about Pygmy sperm whale ink, I decided to compare that ink to two more well studied inks: Aplysia (aka sea hares) and cuttlefish! We know a good bit about their composition and predators so it was a nice basis to compare these weird inking whales to. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ...⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ To keep it short, I’m looking at how ink from these three species compare chemically as well as how they affect predators. Since the pygmy sperm whale ink is the main focus, I test this by exposing sharks to the ink using some behavioral and electrophysiological experiments 🦈💜 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ...⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ The main reason I love my project is because I have 4 super cool study species all in one: slugs, cephalopods, whales, and sharks. I think my next posts are going to go into each one of them: why their cool and what I use ‘em for. What do you guys think?
  • 2 1 14 minutes ago
  • Por @studioartelauratattoo - Um anticorpo artificial demonstrou sua eficácia em ratos para eliminar células cancerosas, o pode representar um avanç...
  • Por @studioartelauratattoo - Um anticorpo artificial demonstrou sua eficácia em ratos para eliminar células cancerosas, o pode representar um avanço na imunoterapia para tratar a leucemia mieloide aguda, segundo estudo publicado na revista científica "Science Translational". O anticorpo MGD006 remaneja as células T para combater este tipo de leucemia, que é muito difícil de tratar e carece de um tratamento efetivo. As células T são um tipo de célula imunológica cuja função é reconhecer substâncias estranhas na superfície de outras células e matá-las, para que produzem substâncias solúveis que têm efeitos sobre tumores e células infectadas com vírus. A leucemia mieloide aguda é um tipo de câncer produzido nas células da linha mielóide (originária da medula) dos leucócitos. Ele se caracteriza pela rápida proliferação de células anormais que se acumulam na medula óssea e interferem na produção de glóbulos vermelhos normais. As imunoterapias testadas até agora se centraram no antígeno CD123, com presença excessiva nesta leucemia e outros tipos de câncer. O anticorpo MGD006, funde fragmentos de dois anticorpos diferentes: um para o antígeno CD123 da leucemia e outro para o antígeno CD3 das células T. Em uma semana de tratamento contínuo, o anticorpo eliminou as células com leucemia em ratos e, aplicado durante quatro semanas em macacos, os animais não experimentaram efeitos colaterais graves. Fonte : O Globo Foto: exame abril #bioemmovimento #sextabiotecnologica #biotecnology #biotec #biotecnologia #biologia #biology #imuno #imunologia #cancer #pesquisa #cienciabiologicas #cientista #ciencia #science #scientist #pesquisadores #amorabiotecnologia #bio #tratamentodocancer #leucemia #leucemiaguda #anticorpo #cel #celulas #celulasT #leucemiamieloide #leucemiamieloideaguda #leucocitos #tecnologia
  • 3 0 24 minutes ago
  • Um anticorpo artificial demonstrou sua eficácia em ratos para eliminar células cancerosas, o pode representar um avanço na imunoterapia para tratar...
  • Um anticorpo artificial demonstrou sua eficácia em ratos para eliminar células cancerosas, o pode representar um avanço na imunoterapia para tratar a leucemia mieloide aguda, segundo estudo publicado na revista científica "Science Translational". O anticorpo MGD006 remaneja as células T para combater este tipo de leucemia, que é muito difícil de tratar e carece de um tratamento efetivo. As células T são um tipo de célula imunológica cuja função é reconhecer substâncias estranhas na superfície de outras células e matá-las, para que produzem substâncias solúveis que têm efeitos sobre tumores e células infectadas com vírus. A leucemia mieloide aguda é um tipo de câncer produzido nas células da linha mielóide (originária da medula) dos leucócitos. Ele se caracteriza pela rápida proliferação de células anormais que se acumulam na medula óssea e interferem na produção de glóbulos vermelhos normais. As imunoterapias testadas até agora se centraram no antígeno CD123, com presença excessiva nesta leucemia e outros tipos de câncer. O anticorpo MGD006, funde fragmentos de dois anticorpos diferentes: um para o antígeno CD123 da leucemia e outro para o antígeno CD3 das células T. Em uma semana de tratamento contínuo, o anticorpo eliminou as células com leucemia em ratos e, aplicado durante quatro semanas em macacos, os animais não experimentaram efeitos colaterais graves. Fonte : O Globo Foto: exame abril #bioemmovimento #sextabiotecnologica #biotecnology #biotec #biotecnologia #biologia #biology #imuno #imunologia #cancer #pesquisa #cienciabiologicas #cientista #ciencia #science #scientist #pesquisadores #amorabiotecnologia #bio #tratamentodocancer #leucemia #leucemiaguda #anticorpo #cel #celulas #celulasT #leucemiamieloide #leucemiamieloideaguda #leucocitos #tecnologia
  • 9 0 35 minutes ago
  • 49 years ago from today, this happened. 
Apollo 11 made an evolutionary change, in the eyes of mankind.
  • 49 years ago from today, this happened. Apollo 11 made an evolutionary change, in the eyes of mankind.
  • 4 1 an hour ago
  • This organ used to hold all of a person’s memories, perceptions, and dreams. This organ *was* a person. Doesn’t that fill you with awe?
  • This organ used to hold all of a person’s memories, perceptions, and dreams. This organ *was* a person. Doesn’t that fill you with awe?
  • 294 9 an hour ago
  • “It would probably be a shorter list if I said what I was not interested in. I have a problem in that most of the things I encounter are interestin...
  • “It would probably be a shorter list if I said what I was not interested in. I have a problem in that most of the things I encounter are interesting to me. I will dig in [for a while] and then I’ll move on to something else and then on to something else. Our whole house and our whole life is filled with incomplete projects and incomplete activities because I just haven’t had time to get back to them yet. It’s not that they are less interesting, there’s just more of them than I have time for.” . Ed Barrows retired 8 years ago from a career as a project manager in technology and scientific R & D. He says “it is only since I retired I've had the luxury of rambling around through the most interesting nooks and crannies of science and technology. Citizen science has extended its reach into (almost) every conceivable area and now it's all available to anyone with a little time. No matter the issue or discipline, I've been able to participate in a much wider range of sciences than any career could have allowed. From classification of galaxies, to deciphering bits of ancient Greek writing on papyri from an Egyptian dump, to transcribing Civil War memos, and to looking for evidence of planets around other stars, there is no end to the range of opportunities. I report on weather phenomenon, wildlife activities, seasonal budding of plants and on and on. It's the most fun anyone could possibly have.” Ed also leads tours at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. (3 of 3) . . . #science #scientist #research #researcher #scicomm #citizenscience #northcarolina
  • 3 0 an hour ago
  • Egyptian authorities opened a 2,000-year-old sealed black granite sarcophagus on Thursday, an artifact that has become a media sensation since it w...
  • Egyptian authorities opened a 2,000-year-old sealed black granite sarcophagus on Thursday, an artifact that has become a media sensation since it was discovered in the Egyptian city of Alexandria on July 1. According to Egypt Today, the sarcophagus contains three male mummified bodies, one of which appears to have sustained head injuries. Unfortunately, the bodies were damaged by sewer water that leaked into the chamber. Still, further details about the bodies are expected to be forthcoming as experts continue studying the remains. One thing is certain, though, according to Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri: The occupants of the sarcophagus were likely not members of the Ptolemaic dynasty, as some commentatorshad proposed. The lack of any discernible inscriptions or expensive items within the tomb suggests they are not bonafide Ptolemies, the Greco-Egyptian royal family that reigned from 304 and 30 BC—bookended by the larger-than-life leaders Alexander the Great and Cleopatra. Waziri also pushed back on hype about mummy curses, which predictably flourished on the internet after the coffin was discovered. "The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse," he said. Measuring nine feet long, five feet wide, and six feet tall, the sarcophagus was found during construction in the Sidi Gaber district of Alexandria. Like many tantalizing archeological finds, especially from Egypt, it attracted worldwide attention and a flood of energetic speculation. “Egyptian archaeology is probably the most sensationalized archaeology there is,” Christopher Monroe, an archeologist and Near Eastern Studies expert at Cornell, told me in an email. “Egyptomania is fun and helpful to the Egyptian economy, but it is unfortunate how it distracts from truly interesting research.”
  • 4 1 an hour ago
  • @backyardbrains has created an amazing product for us to teach middle to high school students about neuroscience. I didn’t even have cool gadgets l...
  • @backyardbrains has created an amazing product for us to teach middle to high school students about neuroscience. I didn’t even have cool gadgets like these when I was in high school. Isn’t it amazing? . In this protocol 📄 students anesthetize the cricket and removes one of its hind-legs to record the neuron’s electrical pulses. 🔬 These neurons are firing continuously for 5-10 min after detachment. Don’t worry, crickets can grow back their legs. Their hind-legs can detach to allow them distract and escape from a potential predator.
  • 2 1 an hour ago
  • Me and my cancer cells.

I am so excited about my ongoing project where we treat our tumour cell with an epigenetic modulating drug and then analys...
  • Me and my cancer cells. I am so excited about my ongoing project where we treat our tumour cell with an epigenetic modulating drug and then analyse the expression of various cell surface receptors as well as the cytokines secreted into the media. Cytokines are very important small signaling peptides enabling cell communication without any direct cell-cell contact. Physiologically the cells secrete specific cytokines as response to any stimuli into the periphery and blood to inform other cells- in cell culture we can mimic this effect by measuring the conditioned media. Different cytokines trigger different cell responses e.g. the initiation of an immune response, differentiation into a mature cell type, apoptosis which is the programmed death mechanism of the cell, but also tissue formation processes like neovascularisation (formation of new blood vessels). 👩‍🔬🔬💊 With all these information collected we try to better understand the molecular pathomechanisms of tumour growth.
  • 19 2 1 hours ago
  • Um anticorpo artificial demonstrou sua eficácia em ratos para eliminar células cancerosas, o pode representar um avanço na imunoterapia para tratar...
  • Um anticorpo artificial demonstrou sua eficácia em ratos para eliminar células cancerosas, o pode representar um avanço na imunoterapia para tratar a leucemia mieloide aguda, segundo estudo publicado na revista científica "Science Translational". O anticorpo MGD006 remaneja as células T para combater este tipo de leucemia, que é muito difícil de tratar e carece de um tratamento efetivo. As células T são um tipo de célula imunológica cuja função é reconhecer substâncias estranhas na superfície de outras células e matá-las, para que produzem substâncias solúveis que têm efeitos sobre tumores e células infectadas com vírus. A leucemia mieloide aguda é um tipo de câncer produzido nas células da linha mielóide (originária da medula) dos leucócitos. Ele se caracteriza pela rápida proliferação de células anormais que se acumulam na medula óssea e interferem na produção de glóbulos vermelhos normais. As imunoterapias testadas até agora se centraram no antígeno CD123, com presença excessiva nesta leucemia e outros tipos de câncer. O anticorpo MGD006, funde fragmentos de dois anticorpos diferentes: um para o antígeno CD123 da leucemia e outro para o antígeno CD3 das células T. Em uma semana de tratamento contínuo, o anticorpo eliminou as células com leucemia em ratos e, aplicado durante quatro semanas em macacos, os animais não experimentaram efeitos colaterais graves. Fonte : O Globo Foto: exame abril #bioemmovimento #sextabiotecnologica #biotecnology #biotec #biotecnologia #biologia #biology #imuno #imunologia #cancer #pesquisa #cienciabiologicas #cientista #ciencia #science #scientist #pesquisadores #amorabiotecnologia #bio #tratamentodocancer #leucemia #leucemiaguda #anticorpo #cel #celulas #celulasT #leucemiamieloide #leucemiamieloideaguda #leucocitos #tecnologia
  • 292 1 2 hours ago
  • TGIF!
🌊🌊🌊
Stoked to be spending the next few days at home in Houston! Visiting family has already been so so good for reducing my stress levels....
  • TGIF! 🌊🌊🌊 Stoked to be spending the next few days at home in Houston! Visiting family has already been so so good for reducing my stress levels. 🌊🌊🌊 Time off is important, y’all. Self-care is not something I practiced during much of my master’s degree, and it really took a toll. Before my graduation, there were months of not sleeping, regularly working 12 hours in the lab, running to campus at 1am to move samples and turn off machines, and spending most of my free time working a second job. While none of these things are particularly uncommon (most of this is par for the course in grad school 🤷🏼‍♀️), doing this without taking any time to recharge is bad for your health. I got sick A LOT, felt pretty blue at some points, and overall wasn’t honoring any of my needs. 🌊🌊🌊 As a PhD student, I have a better schedule now, and I try to be honest with myself about my wellbeing and my feelings- I now consider them a marker of my personal AND academic progress. Just like a car won’t go without gas, neither can we achieve our goals without nourishing our bodies and minds. I make time to recharge by getting exercise, not checking my emails before/after a certain time, cooking a delicious meal, or having a dance party with Mark and our pets. Most importantly, I try to not feel guilty about it. Remember: if you’re gonna do anything, do it all the way! This includes science just as much as sleeping in! 🌊🌊🌊 School, the real world, and life can be hard. There’s no one-size-fits-all to relaxing and decompressing, but taking a walk, watching a movie, and laughing with people important to you are free and easy ways to help you be the best version of you. Maintaining personal wellbeing is something society is good at ignoring (hello STEM fields!), but being open about needing to recharge is critical to making science more inclusive, and not something we should feel guilty about or ashamed of. Besidses, the world needs more happy people, amiright?! 🌊🌊🌊 What do you do to unwind? Leave some suggestions below!
  • 313 12 2 hours ago
  • Lots of fresh vintage science books hitting the shelves today.
  • Lots of fresh vintage science books hitting the shelves today.
  • 32 2 2 hours ago
  • Another tough week. Another camper telling me this was the BEST week of his life. He has no idea how much I needed to hear that and how much it abs...
  • Another tough week. Another camper telling me this was the BEST week of his life. He has no idea how much I needed to hear that and how much it absolutely made my day and week. I must be doing something right!
  • 5 1 2 hours ago
  • Glow Show Part 2! This time my campers helped!
  • Glow Show Part 2! This time my campers helped!
  • 9 1 2 hours ago
  • The near-Earth asteroid 2017 YE5 was discovered on December 21, 2017 by astronomers with the Morocco Oukaimeden Sky Survey, but no details about th...
  • The near-Earth asteroid 2017 YE5 was discovered on December 21, 2017 by astronomers with the Morocco Oukaimeden Sky Survey, but no details about the asteroid’s physical properties were known until the end of June 2018. On June 21, 2017 YE5 made its closest approach to Earth for at least the next 170 years, coming to within 3.7 million miles (6 million km) of Earth, or about 16 times the distance between Earth and the Moon. On June 21 and 22, observations by the Goldstone Solar System Radar showed the first signs that the asteroid could be a binary system. The observations revealed two distinct lobes, but the asteroid’s orientation was such that astronomers could not see if the two bodies were separate or joined. Eventually, the two objects rotated to expose a distinct gap between them. Arecibo Observatory astronomers had already planned to observe 2017 YE5, and they were alerted by their colleagues at Goldstone of the asteroid’s unique properties. On June 24, they teamed up with researchers at the Green Bank Observatory and used the two observatories together in a bi-static radar configuration — in which Arecibo transmits the radar signal and Green Bank receives the return signal. Together, the observatories were able to confirm that 2017 YE5 consists of two separated objects. The new observations obtained between June 21 and 26 indicate that the two objects revolve around each other once every 20 to 24 hours. Radar imaging shows that the two objects are larger than their combined optical brightness originally suggested, indicating that the two rocks do not reflect as much sunlight as a typical rocky asteroid. 2017 YE5 is likely as dark as charcoal. The Goldstone images taken on June 21 also show a striking difference in the radar reflectivity of the two objects, a phenomenon not seen previously among more than 50 other binary asteroid systems studied by radar since 2000.
  • 6 1 2 hours ago
  • Only less than a century ago, back on Earth, planting a national flag in another part of the world still amounted to claiming that territory for th...
  • Only less than a century ago, back on Earth, planting a national flag in another part of the world still amounted to claiming that territory for the fatherland. Did the Stars and Stripes on the moon signify the establishment of an American colony? Of course, claiming new national territories had been very much a European habit, applied to non-European parts of the world. The legal notion that planting a flag was an act of establishing sovereignty quickly stuck and became accepted worldwide as part and parcel of the law of nations. Obviously, the astronauts had more important things on their mind than contemplating the legal meaning and consequences of that planted flag, but luckily the issue had been taken care of prior to the mission. Since the beginning of the space race the United States knew that for many people around the world the sight of a U.S. flag on the Moon would raise major political issues. Any suggestion that the moon might become, legally speaking, part of U.S. backwaters might fuel such concerns, and possibly give rise to international disputes harmful to both the U.S. space program and U.S. interests as a whole. The simple answer to the question of whether Armstrong and Aldrin by way of their small ceremony did transform the moon, or at least a major part thereof, into U.S. territory turns out to be "no." They, nor NASA, nor the U.S. government intended the U.S. flag to have that effect. Most importantly, that answer was enshrined in the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, to which both the United States and the Soviet Union as well as all other space-faring nations, had become a party. Both superpowers agreed that "colonization" on Earth had been responsible for tremendous human suffering and many armed conflicts that had raged over the last centuries. They were determined not to repeat that mistake of the old European colonial powers when it came to decide on the legal status of the moon; at least the possibility of a "land grab" in outer space giving rise to another world war was to be avoided. By that token, the moon became something of a "global commons" legally accessible to all countries – two years prior to the first actual manned moon landing
  • 4 1 5 hours ago
  • There is likely an unimaginably large haul of diamonds buried more than 100 miles below our planet’s surface — far deeper than any drilling expedit...
  • There is likely an unimaginably large haul of diamonds buried more than 100 miles below our planet’s surface — far deeper than any drilling expedition has been before. The discovery is the result of an anomaly in seismic activity data kept by agencies like the United States Geological Survey. Scientists are able to use this data to gain an understanding of what the Earth’s interior might look like, since sound waves move at different speeds depending on the temperature, density, and composition of the rocks they travel through. By analyzing this data, the researchers suggest that a fraction of the cratonic roots — the oldest and least movable sections of rock beneath the center of most continental tectonic plates — is probably made up of diamonds. “This problem was an integrated puzzle that required input from lots of different scientists to work out,” Joshua Garber, from the Earth Science department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, told Digital Trends. “We know that seismic waves generated by earthquakes pass through certain parts of the mantle faster than we expect. We tested numerous combinations of different possible constituents that could explain these wave speeds. We found that one to two percent diamond is compatible with a whole host of constraints including the wave speeds, but also a number of independent datasets. And we know that the amount of diamond required is compatible with the amount of carbon in the bulk Earth and the mantle.” Sadly, there is very little chance of anyone managing to retrieve the diamond haul — through human efforts, at any rate. “The only way these diamonds will get to the surface is through natural excavation by kimberlite pipes,” Garber continued. “Kimberlites are explosive mantle volcanic products that involve the interaction between carbon-hydrogen-oxygen fluids and the mantle, and result in pieces of the cratonic mantle being picked up and carried to the surface. The depths we considered are far too deep for human drilling. The rocks are just too hot and under too much pressure for us to get down there.”
  • 2 1 5 hours ago
  • Community Helper Peg Dolls. Pick your favorite 5 or collect them all!! Which is your favorite? Comment below. ***boxes and cute kids not included
  • Community Helper Peg Dolls. Pick your favorite 5 or collect them all!! Which is your favorite? Comment below. ***boxes and cute kids not included
  • 18 4 10 hours ago